How to Start Learning Gaelic

Learning a new language can be a daunting task. With all the different options that are available it can be hard to decide which will suit you best and get you on the right path to that final goal ? Fluency!

There are many benefits to learning a language, not just Gaelic! New languages always come hand in hand with new cultures, stories and music which can lead to opportunities that weren’t previously available to you. Gaelic is no exception – so why wait?

Here’s a good guide for where to start and where to find the best possible mix of resources to help you achieve your Gaelic goals.

Start With Pronunciation

Gaelic is a phonetic language. Certain letters, when grouped together in a word will always make the same sound, but not the same sound as they would in English. This means it can be quite confusing at first but it also means that once you know and understand the sounds you can apply them to any word in Gaelic, and upon hearing a word for the first time can have an idea of how it would look when written.

It’s much easier to learn this right the first time round rather than learning the words without hearing them and having to teach yourself again at a later stage. There are some fantastic resources available to help with this online such as Beag air Bheag or the Learn Gaelic Dictionary where there are recordings of the pronunciations.

Books

Books can be an excellent resource for learning Gaelic. There are loads available and a really good way to learn is getting one that comes with an audio CD included, to ensure the correct pronunciation. 

Acair have a range of books, short stories and poetry, although make sure you use them alongside online pronunciation resources to keep you on the right track as these books more than likely won’t come with a CD!

You can also get 10% off if you use the code Young10Scot when purchasing Gaelic books with Acair!

DVD

DVDs, although perhaps a little dated with the rise of streaming services, can still be a useful resource! ‘Speaking our Language’ is a good example and is available on the Learn Gaelic website.

News Programs

News programs, such as BBC An Là, are another great way to improve your language skills and vocabulary. They can seem daunting and hard to follow at first but if you use Learning With An Là on the Learn Gaelic website there is a text box that highlights what’s being said in real time, making it much easier to follow, and will also help with connecting the way words sound and the way they are written and spelled. This will also help with getting to grips with Gaelic’s grammar and sentence structures, as they are different from the structures used in English.

Distance and Short Courses

Distance courses and Short courses are one of the best resources available to any Gaelic learner. Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, a Gaelic college that’s part of The University of the Highlands and Islands, offer a number of both short courses and distance learning courses.

Short Courses allow you to learn at your own rate using the resources available and if you have some spare time, you can enroll yourself into a course that lasts no more than a week or two, run by excellent, experienced tutors who can help with the finer details and any of the basics you might struggle with. There are short courses for people of all levels so you won’t be left stuck in a class that is too easy or too hard for you, no matter your fluency level!

Distance Learning Courses provide a more long-term, structured learning option and can be accessed from anywhere in the world. Through the use of online video calls and phone classes, lessons can be had on a regular basis to help keep your grasp and understanding of Gaelic steadily advancing.

Other People!

This is without a doubt the best resource available to you!

The best thing for any Gaelic learner is to speak to other speakers as early and often as possible in their learning journey and there are a number of ways to do this.

In a lot of communities in Scotland there are Gaelic speaking groups who meet on a regularly so that speakers of all levels can come together to use and improve their Gaelic in an open, friendly, helpful environment. Most of these can be found with a quick search online and they’re always looking for new members!

When learning a new language it’s best to use as many different resources as possible instead of just one. Every resource has different benefits and by using more than one you can make sure you’re not missing out on anything.

For more information and resources head back our Gaelic homepage.

Other content you might be interested in

All ages

Gaelic Resources

A list of resources to learn or improve your Gaelic!

Gaelic Resources
All ages

What is FilmG?

John from Young Scot shares his experience with FilmG and how it’s about more than just winning an award, read…

What is FilmG?
All ages

Gaelic Phrases - Introductory

Learn some Gaelic! This article covers introductory phrases such as asking for someone’s name and how they are doing.

Gaelic Phrases - Introductory
All ages

Scottish Gaelic & Irish

Scottish Gaelic and Irish Gaelic are often compared, but what are the similarities and differences?

Scottish Gaelic & Irish
All ages

Why is Gaelic Important?

Learn more about why people think Gaelic is important as a language and as part of Scottish culture.

Why is Gaelic Important?
All ages

Scottish Gaelic History

A brief history of Gaelic in Scotland from the medieval ages to the present.

Scottish Gaelic History
All ages

Young Carers

Find out how to apply for the Young Carers Package, Carer’s Allowance and the Young Carers Grant. Hear stories from…

Young Carers
HIDE PAGELeave this site quickly
Back to top of the page