The 5Rights Youth Leadership Group's Investigation

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Curious about what happens during the Youth Leadership Group's investigation? One of our 5Rights Youth Leaders, Dev, has written about their experience with the 5Rights Youth Leadership Group.

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I’ve been involved with Young Scot and the 5Rights initiative for about two and a half years, and a big part of the process of both the Young Scot 5Rights Youth Commission, and now, the 5Rights Youth Leadership Group, is residential meetings. These tend to consist of two full-length days (almost always a weekend) of researching and exploring problems, and in the later residentials, pondering and building solutions to those problems.

Our residentials are intensive and productive, but overall, we take a fun approach to exploring these problems. Surprisingly, almost all of our residentials are spent exploring the problems we are trying to solve. This means our solutions are more well-informed, and usually based on research deployed by us be it through practical activities like attending conferences and presenting at them, conducting surveys, or interacting with other young people, as well as using research through other works we find. Our first few residentials have been about this.

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We had the second residential in February, and our main activities consisted of thinking hard about the gaps in our knowledge of our respective subjects, and overall, about what we needed to research. This gave us some really good ideas, and cleared up any uncertainties about the information required to create our solutions. Along with this, we came up with some goals for our next residential meeting.

With investigation comes evidence, and much of the evidence we acquire comes from connecting with experts from across the country. Some of the experts who have fed into our investigation include Twitter, Google, and Education Scotland. During our second residential, we received evidence from Police Scotland and their strategy for young people’s digital safety. Seeing how Police Scotland’s peer education programme was employed gave us some inspiration for our own project.

I can’t wait to see where the rest of our investigation and evidence-gathering takes us. It’s an amazing experience getting to be part of something so important, especially in 2018. I look forward to the future of digital rights for young people.